FAQs - Data

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Can data be downloaded or accessed via an API?

An API to access Active Places facility data does not presently exist.  

An API to access Active Places facility is something we are working on. Our intention is to establish APIs to allow full integration into back end GIS systems or other databases held by local authorities or other partners.  Unfortunatley we are not in a position to provide timescales on availability but will update the FAQs as soon as they are ready.

Presently Active Places Facility data can be downloaded either via:

1)  Active Places Power reports (most likely the Detailed Report) for a given area of interest, which will create a snapshot report that can be downloaded as a single csv file.  The single csv file contains a standard set of fields including Easting and Northing grid coordinates.

2) – Active Places Open Data (see APP webpage footer - no login required) which includes all facilities EXCEPT those that are: closed, under construction, planned or are marked as private on the database.

Active Places Open Data is available as CSV flat files and JSON format, both of which are updated on a nightly basis.   (Note this replaces the version previously available via the spogo website, which was decommissioned in January 2015.)   


How can I provide feedback on the facility data within the website?


Should you want to provide detailed facility feedback or want to update a lot of information for your area of interest (for example for a local sport and recreation strategy) please contact Adetiq on 01273 202212 or activeplaces.data@sportengland.org.   Adetiq replaced The Leisure Database Company as the 
Active Places Data Validation Team on 2nd November 2015.  


How frequently does active places data get updated?

Active Places records are maintained via a combination of a third party (Adetiq) who are contracted by Sport England to collect, validate and maintain sport facility data in addition to individual facility owners and managers who have taken responsibility to self-maintain and update information on their own facility records.  

As updates are collected they are processed to the live database and immediately available within the Active Places Power website.  Proir to 2nd November 2015 updates were made available on a weekly basis.  


Is Active Places data available in GIS formats?

Active Places facility data is not available in native GIS formats such as Esri shapefile. 

However, the geocoded Active Places Facility data can be downloaded either via:

1)  Active Places Power reports (most likely the Detailed Report) for a given area of interest, which will create a snapshot report that can be downloaded as a single csv file.  The single csv file contains a standard set of fields including Easting and Northing grid coordinates.

2) – Active Places Open Data (see APP webpage footer - no login required) which includes all facilities EXCEPT those that are: closed, under construction, planned or are marked as private on the database. This data is in a number of CSV flat files and is updated on a monthly basis.  Again all sport facility records contain Easting and Northing coordinates. 

Note this replaces the version previously available via the spogo website, which was decommissioned in January 2015.  This download provides the most comprehensive set of active places data but records within each file need to be linked together via common IDs and lookups.  


What are County Sports Partnership areas?


There are 49 County Sports Partnerships (CSPs) covering England representing local networks of:

• Local Authorities
• National Governing Bodies (NGBs) for sport
• Clubs
• Schools and School Sport Partnerships
• Primary care trusts

The also include other local agencies committed to working together to increase participation in sport and physical activity. CSPs are led by a central team of people whose job it is to provide leadership and co-ordination of the network.

For more information see - http://www.cspnetwork.org

What are the criteria for facility inclusion?

The following criteria are used to determine inclusion within the Active Places database:

• Public sector, including local authority (including parish councils)
• Education (including further and higher education), Ministry of Defence and Health
• Sports clubs, including: local sports clubs and Civil Service Sports & Social Club
• Private/commercial, including: hotels, leisure clubs and private sector chain providers

What are the small area participation estimates?

In order to show variation at a sub local authority level, participation had to be modelled at the Middle Super Output area (MSOA) level. These synthetic or modelled estimates combine Sport England’s Active People Survey 3 (Oct 2008-Oct 2009) and Active People Survey 4 (October 2009-October 2010) survey data with other data sources that are available at the area level (for example, health indicators, socioeconomic status etc.).

As with Active People Survey participation, synthetic estimates are modelled for 1) Sport only 2) Sport and active recreation. Active Places Power only references the sport only 3 x 30 small area estimate measure.

For more information see the small area estimate website:
http://sae.sportengland.org/FAQ.aspx

What is Rural Urban Classification data?

The Rural Urban Classification is an Official Statistic provided by the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and is used to distinguish rural and urban areas. The Classification defines areas as rural if they fall outside of settlements with more than 10,000 resident population.  For more information on this dataset see https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/2011-rural-urban-classification.

Within Active Places Power, the Rural Urban Classification (RUC) is a single map layer classifying each Lower Super Output Area (LSOA) with its RUC setting.  See Map > Map Layers > Environment Data > Rural Urban Classification.  Eight classifications are defined within the single map layer.  They are:   

    • A1 - Urban major conurbation

    • B1 - Urban minor conurbation

    • C1 - Urban city and town

    • C2 - Urban city and town (sparse)

    • D1 - Rural town and fringe

    • D2 - Rural town and fringe (sparse)

    • E1 - Rural village and dispersed

    • E2 - Rural village and dispersed (sparse)


What is sports market segmentation and why is it no longer available?

Sport England commissioned Experian to create the sports market segmentation data in 2007 and subsequently refresh the data in 2010. The data groups the adult population (18 and above) of England into 19 segments that provide an in-depth understanding of people's attitudes and behaviours towards taking part in sport.

The 19 sport segments each have an extensive set of characteristics that define them. To fully interrogate these characteristics refer to the segments website (link below). Active Places currently only provides population counts for each of the 19 segments.

For more information on the market segments include Pen Portraits pdf documents for each segment and a comprehensive set of sport market segmentation FAQs see the segments website - http://segments.sportengland.org

UPDATE March 2018:  Why is Market Segmentation data no longer available?

While we appreciate Market Segmentation data has been a valuable tool for partners over the years, it is now some way out of date – last updated in 2010 and so based upon Active People Survey data for Apr 2009/10. Not only do we know that activity levels have shifted in that time (step up overall leading up to London 2012 and many shifts within different sports) but also Sporting Future (government's sport strategy) has led to a change in Sport England's strategic direction and headline metrics.

Sport England no longer focus on weekly participation, the key APS metric feeding the segmentation tool, instead we look to understand active lifestyles as per CMO (Chief Medical Office) guidelines of 150+ minutes a week. We also have a broader activity mix, no longer focusing solely on sport in the traditional sense but also on physical activity through walking, active travel and dance (alongside sporting activities, fitness and cycling which we have always had a focus on).

Sport England are looking at our options for a segmentation style resource going forwards but this thinking is in the very early ‘thought’ stages and there is currently no commitment to any replacement tool. To fill the gap in the interim we recommend the use of ONS’s segmentation. Whilst not overlaying the activity data from Active Lives this does provide a useful categorisation of the population for targeting purposes – for example it is relatively easy to identify a number of segments that would fit a lower social-economic group focus. We will ourselves be considering this resource for any future ‘Sport England’ segmentation.


What is the Active Places Data Platform?

Sport England has developed a new online tool called the Active Places Data Platform (https://dataplatform.activeplacespower.com).  The (password protected) platform is used to manage and maintain the national sport facility database (Active Places) in real-time.  

Data records are collected, validated and maintained by Adetiq - Sport England's appointed (November 2015) Active Places Data Validation Team contractor. In addition the fully self-service platform allows individual facility owners and managers to self manage their facility data.  This enables the data to be maintained by those who know their facilities the best and ensures data is as up to date as possible. 

For any queries regarding the Active Places Data Platform contact Adetiq on 01273 202212 or activeplaces.data@sportengland.org


What is the English Indicies of Deprivation data?

The English indices of deprivation 2015 is an Official Statistic provided by the Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government and are statistics on relative deprivation in small areas in England. The English indices of deprivation ranks every small area in England from 1 (most deprived area) to 32,844 (least deprived area).  The Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) combines information from seven domains to produce an overall relative measure of deprivation.  For more information on this dataset see https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/english-indices-of-deprivation-2015.

 Within Active Places Power, the English indices of deprivation consist of the IMD, 7 domains and two additional Income Indexes each as dedicated map layers.  See Map > Map Layers > Population Data > Indices of Deprivation (2015).   

 Seven domains of deprivation are combined to produce the overall Index of Multiple Deprivation, each of which contains a number of component indicators.

The criteria for inclusion of these indicators are that they should be ‘domain specific’ and appropriate for the purpose of measuring major features of that deprivation; up-to-date; capable of being updated on a regular basis; statistically robust; and available for the whole of England at a small area level in a consistent form.

  

Income Deprivation Domain

The Income Deprivation Domain measures the proportion of the population in an area experiencing deprivation relating to low income. The definition of low income used includes both those people that are out-of-work, and those that are in work but who have low earnings (and who satisfy the respective means tests).  A combined count of income deprived individuals per Lower-layer Super Output Area is calculated by summing the following six non-overlapping indicators:

  • - Adults and children in Income Support families
  • - Adults and children in income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance families
  • - Adults and children in income-based Employment and Support Allowance families
  • - Adults and children in Pension Credit (Guarantee) families
  • - Adults and children in Working Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit families not already counted, that is those who are not in receipt of Income Support,
  • - income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, income-based Employment and Support Allowance or Pension Credit (Guarantee) and whose equivalised income (excluding housing benefit) is below 60 per cent of the median before housing costs
  • - Asylum seekers in England in receipt of subsistence support, accommodation support, or both.

 

In addition an Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index and an Income Deprivation Affecting Older People Index were created, respectively representing the proportion of children aged 0-15, and people aged 60 and over, living in income deprived households.

  

Employment Deprivation Domain

The Employment Deprivation Domain measures the proportion of the working age population in an area involuntarily excluded from the labour market. This includes people who would like to work but are unable to do so due to unemployment, sickness or disability, or caring responsibilities. A combined count of employment deprived individuals per Lower-layer Super Output Area is calculated by summing the following five non-overlapping indicators:

  • - Claimants of Jobseeker’s Allowance (both contribution-based and income based), women aged 18 to 59 and men aged 18 to 64
  • - Claimants of Employment and Support Allowance, women aged 18 to 59 and men aged 18 to 64
  • - Claimants of Incapacity Benefit, women aged 18 to 59 and men aged 18 to 64
  • - Claimants of Severe Disablement Allowance, women aged 18 to 59 and men aged 18 to 64
  • - Claimants of Carer’s Allowance, women aged 18 to 59 and men aged 18 to 64.

  

Education, Skills and Training Deprivation Domain

The Education, Skills and Training Domain measures the lack of attainment and skills in the local population. The indicators fall into two sub-domains: one relating to children and young people and one relating to adult skills. These two subdomains are designed to reflect the ‘flow’ and ‘stock’ of educational disadvantage within an area respectively. That is, the ‘children and young people’ sub-domain measures the attainment of qualifications and associated measures (‘flow’), while the ‘skills’ sub-domain measures the lack of qualifications in the resident working age adult population (‘stock’).

  

  • - Children and Young People sub-domain
    • - Key Stage 2 attainment: The average points score of pupils taking reading, writing and mathematics Key Stage 2 exams12
    • - Key Stage 4 attainment: The average capped points score of pupils taking Key Stage 4
    • - Secondary school absence: The proportion of authorised and unauthorised absences from secondary school
    • - Staying on in education post 16: The proportion of young people not staying on in school or non-advanced education above age 16
    • - Entry to higher education: A measure of young people aged under 21 not entering higher education.

 

  • - Adult Skills sub-domain is a non-overlapping count of two indicators:

    • - Adult skills: The proportion of working age adults with no or low qualifications, women aged 25 to 59 and men aged 25 to 64
    • - English language proficiency: The proportion of working age adults who cannot speak English or cannot speak English well, women aged 25 to 59 and men aged 25 to 64.

  

Health Deprivation and Disability Domain

The Health Deprivation and Disability Domain measures the risk of premature death and the impairment of quality of life through poor physical or mental health. The domain measures morbidity, disability and premature mortality but not aspects of behaviour or environment that may be predictive of future health deprivation.

  • - Years of potential life lost: An age and sex standardised measure of premature death
  • - Comparative illness and disability ratio: An age and sex standardised morbidity/disability ratio
  • - Acute morbidity: An age and sex standardised rate of emergency admission to hospital
  • - Mood and anxiety disorders: A composite based on the rate of adults suffering from mood and anxiety disorders, hospital episodes data, suicide mortality data and health benefits data.

  

Crime Domain

Crime is an important feature of deprivation that has major effects on individuals and communities. The Crime Domain measures the risk of personal and material victimisation at local level.

  •  -Violence – number of reported violent crimes (18 reported crime types) per 1000 at risk population
  • - Burglary – number of reported burglaries (4 reported crime types) per 1000 at risk population
  • - Theft – number of reported thefts (5 reported crime types) per 1000 at risk population
  • - Criminal damage – number of reported crimes (8 reported crime types) per 1000 at risk population.

  

Barriers to Housing and Services Domain

This domain measures the physical and financial accessibility of housing and key local services. The indicators fall into two sub-domains: ‘geographical barriers’, which relate to the physical proximity of local services, and ‘wider barriers’ which includes issues relating to access to housing such as affordability.

 

Geographical Barriers sub-domain

  • - Road distance to a post office
  • - Road distance to a primary school
  • - Road distance to a general store or supermarket
  • - Road distance to a GP surgery.

 

Wider Barriers sub-domain

  • - Household overcrowding: The proportion of all households in a Lower-layer Super Output Area which are judged to have insufficient space to meet the household’s needs
  • - Homelessness: Local authority district level rate of acceptances for housing assistance under the homelessness provisions of the 1996 Housing Act, assigned to the constituent Lower-layer Super Output Areas
  • - Housing affordability: Difficulty of access to owner-occupation or the private rental market, expressed as the inability to afford to enter owner occupation or the private rental market.

  

Living Environment Deprivation Domain

The Living Environment Deprivation Domain measures the quality of the local environment. The indicators fall into two sub-domains. The ‘indoors’ living

environment measures the quality of housing; while the ‘outdoors’ living environment contains measures of air quality and road traffic accidents.

 

Indoors sub-domain

  • - Houses without central heating: The proportion of houses that do not have central heating
  • - Housing in poor condition: The proportion of social and private homes that fail to meet the Decent Homes standard.

 

Outdoors sub-domain

  • - Air quality: A measure of air quality based on emissions rates for four pollutants
  • - Road traffic accidents involving injury to pedestrians and cyclists: A measure of road traffic accidents involving injury to pedestrians and cyclists among the resident and workplace population.

Each individual map layer has a standard symbology based upon a decile classification.  Each Lower Super Output Area (LSOA) has a colour based upon its decile classification. ‘Deciles’ are published alongside ranks within the raw data.  (Deciles are calculated by ranking the 32,844 small areas in England from most deprived to least deprived and dividing them into 10 equal groups.) 


What is the National Statistics Socio-economic Classifications (NS-SeC) data?

The National Statistics Socio-economic Classifications (NS-SeC) is a measure of employment relations and conditions of occupations. These are central to showing the structure of socio-economic positions in modern societies and helping to explain variations in social behaviour and other social phenomena.  For more information on this dataset see http://www.nomisweb.co.uk/census/2011/ks611ew .

 

Within Active Places Power NS-SeC of usual residents aged 16 to 74 are a series of map layers at Lower Super Output Area (LSOA) geographies.  See Map > Map Layers > Population Data > Socio-economic (NS-SeC).  Nine classifications (each as individual map layers) can be displayed showing the percentage of population within each classification or classification grouping.  They are: 

  • - Managerial combined (1-2)

  • - Intermediate occupations (3)

  • - Small employers and own account (4)

  • - Lower supervisory and technical (5)

  • - Intermediate, Small and Lower (3-5)

  • - Routine combined (6-7)

  • - Never worked and unemployed (8)

  • - Routine and not working  (6-8)

  • - Not classified (9)

Each individual map layer has a standard symbology showing the percentage of population within the classification (one or more) divided by total population.  10% intervals up to 100% (deciles) are used. 


What is the Site Details Comments tab used for?

Note, Comments function is currently restricted to Sport England users only.

The Comments tab is used to view and submit local intelligence information relevant to either a site as a whole (if it is relevant to all facilities at that site) or for individual facilities located at the site. 

Local intelligence information will be used to help Sport England and it partners track trends and inform related strategic planning work. 

Note, Sport England will endeavour to moderate comments, where necessary editing or deleting any comment at any time should it be deemed inappropriate or unrelated to the purpose of this function. 

It should also be noted that submitted comments may need to be disclosed by Sport England in accordance with the Freedom of Information (FoI) Act 2000. 

To provide knowledge of any edits to site and facility attribute details (i.e. the size dimensions of a sports hall) please use the “feedback” links located in the top right corner of the Site Details pages.  


What sport participation data is used within active places power?

Active Places uses Sport England's Active People Survey, which is a measure of participation in sport and active recreation at a local authority level. It is a telephone survey of adults living in England (aged 16 years and over) and it identifies how participation varies from place to place and between different groups in the population. The survey was first collected in 2005 and has subsequently been reported on a biannual basis.

Sport England has collected two different measures of participation (as a result of different strategic objectives). 1) Sport only (does not include recreational walking or cycling) 2) Sport and active recreation (formally National Indicator 8). Active Places Power references the sport only measure with the following breaks:

• Zero sessions: Zero sessions of at least moderate intensity sport for at least 30 minutes in the previous 28 days (adults age 16 and over)

• Once a week (4 days ): At least one session a week ( at least 4 sessions of at least moderate intensity sport for at least 30 minutes in the previous 28 days) (adults age 16 and over)

• Three times a week (12 days ): At least three sessions a week (at least 12 sessions of at least moderate intensity sport for at least 30 minutes in the previous 28 days) (adults age 16 and over)

More information can be found on the Sport England website:
Active People Survey - http://www.sportengland.org/research/active_people_survey.aspx
Active People Diagnostic - http://www.sportengland.org/research/active_people_survey/active_people_diagnostic.aspx

Also see "What are the small area participation estimates?" FAQ.  

Which facility types are included within active places?

Active Places currently holds the following Facility types:

  • • Artificial Grass Pitch
  • • Athletics Tracks
  • • Golf
  • • Grass Pitches
  • • Health & Fitness Suite
  • • Ice Rinks
  • • Indoor Bowls
  • • Indoor Tennis Centre
  • • Ski Slopes
  • • Sports Hall
  • • Squash Courts
  • • Studios
  • • Swimming Pool
  • • Tennis Courts

These facilities represent where 70-80% of formal sport takes place and they also tend to be large land users.

A data collection schedule has been developed to expand the number of new facility types held within Active Places. These will be added to the live database and website once collected to the required standards.


Which small area geographies are used within Active Places Power?

Active Places Power uses small area geographies designed by the Office of National Statistics (ONS) to improve the reporting of small area statistics in England and Wales. They are known as Super Output Areas (SOAs) and were developed as an alternative to Wards for calculating small area statistics. Unlike Wards and Postcode geographies, all SOA represent a similar number of people allowing for comparability across smaller geographic areas. The SOA layers form a hierarchy based on aggregations of Output Areas (OAs), as below:

There are three levels:

• OA | Minimum Population: 100 | Mean Population: 300 | Households: 80 | Constrained by: LSOA | Number of records in England and Wales: ~ 175,000

• Lower SOA | Minimum Population: 1000 | Mean Population: 1500 | Households: 400 | Constrained by: Local Authority Wards | Number of records in England and Wales: 32,482 in England, 1896 in Wales

• Middle SOA | Minimum Population: 5000 | Mean Population: 7200 | Households: 2000 | Constrained by: Local Authority Boundaries | Number of records in England and Wales: 6780 in England, 413 in Wales

The above figure refer to the 2001 output area geographies.  Further information can be found on http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/geography/beginner-s-guide/census/super-output-areas--soas-/index.html

Who collects and maintains active places data?

Adetiq are contracted by Sport England to collect, validate and maintain sport facility data within the Active Places database.  Adetiq replaced The Leisure Database Company on 2nd November 2015.  

In addition individual sport facility owners and managers are able to maintain information in real time on their facilities via the self-service Active Places Data Platform.  

Adetiq will continue to update records on a rolling basis primarily through telephone survey with each site being checked on an annual basis.   Data is also updated through feedback from users and through an “intelligent audit” e.g. monitoring of planning permissions, trade press etc. 

Should you want to provide detailed feedback or want to update a lot of information for your area of interest (for example for a local sport and recreation strategy) please Adetiq on 01273 202212 or activeplaces.data@sportengland.org.   


Why are clubs no longer included within active places?

Club data is no longer included with Active Places having been removed in October 2017.  Prior to this club data within Active Places Power was a beta function.  It was a snapshot sample of club data that had been included to demonstrate how club data may be used within the websites tools. However, as there are no plans to update and expand clud data within Active Places Power the decision was taken to remove it.


Why can I not find a facility that I know should be there?

This could be for a number of reasons:

• Maybe it is there. To find a single facility use the Search function to search by Name of Site or Locality (Post Town, Postcode - full or partial, or Local Authority).

• It could be because your definition of a facility differs to ours. Review the Sports Data Model, which defines the database structure, fields and contents.

• If these two steps indicate that the facility should be added to the database please contact our Adetiq, our contracted Data Validation Team on 01273 202212 or activeplaces.data@sportengland.org.